nutrition

Menopausal Weight Gain: How To Get Your Body Back

By Staness Jonekos, Author “The Menopause Makeover”

It is estimated that the average weight gain during the menopause transition is about 10 to 15 pounds.  Well, I must not be average, because I gained almost 30 pounds in less than a year when I slammed into menopause!   Frustrated that I could not find a solution, I sacrificed myself as a human guinea pig and figured out how to lose it all in just 12 weeks.

To be successful, weight loss during menopause demands a new strategy.  It takes more than cutting calories to lose weight during this life transition! I was surprised to discover, according to new research, that for many women menopausal weight gain is not entirely their fault.

The first culprit is aging. Both men and women lose muscle mass as they age, which can lower the body’s resting metabolism, therefore increasing the risk of weight gain and accumulating body fat around the waist.

Many women become less physically active in their 40s, 50s and 60s because life is busy; it’s a challenge to find time to schedule exercise. Less activity means less muscle mass, which means weight gain.

Now get ready for the double whammy:  Aging plus hormone changes.

Studies claim that the perimenopause transition may contribute to increased fat in the abdomen, changing a woman’s shape from a pear to an apple with more of the fat disturbed around the waist. Here’s proof that weight loss is an uphill battle.

As we age and slide into menopause, it is suspected that declining estrogen levels may lower the rate of energy used during exercise.  Weight loss habits and workout routines used in younger years often aren’t as effective as we age.  It takes more work to lose weight. Not achieving your desired results within a certain time frame may increase frustration and decrease motivation.

Declining estrogen levels wreak hormonal havoc that can cause night sweats, and that is a formula for sleepless nights. Sleep deprivation produces increased levels of ghrelin – the hunger hormone – and decreased levels of leptin – the “stop eating” hormone.  This can equal weight gain.

The list continues. Grab a glass of wine and settle in:

  1. Loss of estrogen may make insulin less effective at lowering glucose, and more effective at storing fat.
  2. Suffering from menopausal symptoms can affect a woman’s emotional health…weight goes up, self-esteem goes down.
  3. Normal life and environmental changes, such as children leaving or coming back home, divorce, death, career changes, can be stressful.
  4. The stress hormone, cortisol, directly affects fat storage and weight gain in stressed individuals.  Cortisol is associated with increased appetite, cravings for sugar, and weight gain.
  5. There’s a link between estrogen and body fat storage.  Post-menopausal women burn less fat than they did in their pre-menopausal years.  Cells not only store more fat but are less willing to part with it.
  6. Medical conditions such as insulin resistance (when your body becomes resistant to the insulin it produces) or suffering from an underactive thyroid can pack on the pounds.
  7. Medications that can trigger appetite, slow metabolism, increase fluid retention, and cause muscle cramps decreasing desire to exercise are:  antidepressants, antihistamines, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, insulin, statins and tamoxifin.

                It is no surprise that most women going through “the change” struggle with weight gain more than with troublesome hot flashes.

                Weight management during menopause is important because weight gain increases the risk of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, and some types of cancer, including breast and colon.

                There is good news! Put that glass of Merlot down and walk into your kitchen, because incorporating a new strategy can help you obtain and maintain a healthy weight.

                How food can set you free.  Feeding the new you!

                1. Eat Protein: Women naturally have less muscle mass and testosterone than men, so lean proteins such as, chicken, turkey, fish, beans, soybeans and tofu, dairy protein/Greek yogurt, low fat cottage cheese, egg whites, are a woman’s best friend during menopause.  Your body expends more energy (calories) to process proteins.
                2. Consume healthy fats: olive oil, flaxseeds, salmon, halibut, tuna, avocados, almonds, and walnuts.
                3. Manage blood sugar with low to medium glycemic index foods:  beans, apples, oranges, cherries, plain yogurt, sweet potatoes, oatmeal.
                4. Fiber is your friend keeping you feeling full longer and regular.
                5. Limit alcohol to 2 or less glasses per day:  That totals less than 10 fluid ounces of wine, 24 ounces of beer, or 3 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.  More than two drinks per day may increase the risk of cancer and stroke.
                6. Don’t smoke.
                7. Watch salt intake to reduce fluid retention.
                8. Practice portion control.  Using smaller plates can help.
                9. Keep a food diary and create a food plan.  There are many great apps for your mobile that may help.
                10. Eat every 3-4 hours so you don’t get hungry. Three meals and two snacks per day (three if you wake up early).
                11. Exercise at least 30 minutes most days of the week to maintain a healthy weight; increase workout time if your goal is to lose weight.
                12. Make breakfast and lunch your largest meals.
                13. Nourish healthy emotions: are you happy, are you surrounded by healthy relationships, is your self esteem high?

                If you want to enjoy some dessert after dinner, then don’t eat a starchy carbohydrate, such as white rice, with that meal.  For example dinner can be broiled chicken, steamed veggies and a glass of red wine.  Then you can have your cake and eat it, too (small serving).

                Weight loss is possible with a few changes.  Negotiating the Glycemic Index is a powerful tool.  Aim for low to medium glycemic foods, toss in some physical activity and have realistic expectations.

                Focus on you! Me-NO-pause!

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                Posted in homepage, nutrition

                What Every Woman Should Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

                For those of us who have experienced many unpleasant menopause symptoms, did you know that dry eye is also one of them?

                Eye health becomes increasingly important as we reach our 50s, which is why I’m shedding some light on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in people over 55.

                February is AMD Awareness Month, and chances are, you know someone who has the disease. Over 2 million Americans suffering from AMD and 7 million are at risk– the number is expected to double by 2020.

                To help bring you this important information about AMD, I have joined the #AMDawareness campaign, sponsored by EyePromise.

                WHAT IS AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION?

                The most common form of AMD is “dry” AMD, which 90% of people experience. It’s the deterioration of the retinal pigment epithelial (tissue) cells within the macula. These cells support the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are so critical to vision. When we look at something, the photoreceptors, (a.k.a. rods and cones) collect the images and send them to the brain, where vision takes place.

                The macula is an area near the center of the eye’s retina. This tiny area is responsible for our central, sharpest vision and determines our ability to read, drive a car, see faces or colors, and view objects in fine detail.

                As AMD progresses, our central vision deteriorates and starts to fail. The presence of lipid (a fatty protein) deposits, called drusen, has also been connected with the disease. While drusen likely do not cause age-related macular degeneration (AMD), their existence within the eye increases a person’s risk of developing AMD.

                In about 10 percent of patients, dry AMD can become “wet” AMD, where blood vessels form under the retina, leaking blood and fluid into the eye, according to AllAboutVision. Wet AMD further (and more quickly) distorts the central vision, and can ultimately lead to blindness.

                SYMPTOMS: Distorted, blurry or spotty vision, inability to see clearly in dim lighting. Imagine if a straight line looks wavy!

                RISK FACTORS: Aging is the major cause of AMD, and women are more likely to have the disease than men. Genetics also plays a role, as well as smoking, which can double your risk. AMD is more common in Caucasians than in African Americans and Hispanics, one study shows.

                HOW YOU CAN IMPROVE YOUR EYE HEALTH: What Every Woman Should Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

                Add important nutrients called zeaxanthin and lutein into your diet to help support and improve your macular health. While these ingredients can be found in many leafy greens, oily fish and fruits, you most likely are not getting an adequate dose to significantly support and protect your macular health.

                “The dietary carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein protect the most important retinal real estate of the eye–-the macula–which allows us to see detail. It is therefore critical to maintain the quality and health of this area of retinal tissue in a modern society that depends upon using computer screens and driving automobiles, safely,” said Dr. Stuart Richer, OD, PhD

                If you think you are at risk for age-related macular degeneration, or might have the disease, schedule an appointment with your eye doctor today.


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                Do Menopause and Alcohol Mix?

                Do menopause and alcohol mix?

                You’ve probably heard that moderate drinking is good for your heart. But you’ve probably also heard that it’s a danger for breast cancer and that it can trigger hot flashes. Here are the facts that can help you make decisions about drinking.

                The most important thing is how much you drink. The benefits come with moderate—big emphasis on moderate—drinking. Starting with the Framingham Heart Study, big epidemiologic studies have shown that while moderate drinking has some benefits, drinking much more than that can be detrimental. More than two drinks per day and the negative effects begin to pile up, with increases in the rates of cancer, stroke, and more.

                What’s One Drink?

                This is how the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAA) defines one standard drink:

                • 5 fluid ounces (one glass) of wine (about 12% alcohol). Don’t let your wine glass fool you—most hold much more than 5 ounces.
                • 12 fluid ounces (usually one can or bottle) of regular beer (about 5% alcohol)
                • 1.5 fluid ounces (one shot) of 80-proof distilled spirits

                This is how the NIAA defines different levels of drinking for women:

                • Light: less than one drink per day
                • Moderate: one to two drinks per day
                • Heavy: more than two drinks per day

                How Much Is Good?

                • Light to moderate drinkers have a significantly lower risk of coronary heart disease than nondrinkers. For women, the heart benefits of moderate drinking become apparent at menopause when their heart disease risk normally goes up, and the heart benefits continue after that. Hormone therapy doesn’t affect that benefit.
                • Women who drink moderately have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.
                • Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, especially wine, have a lower risk of dementia than those who don’t drink at all.
                • Women who drink lightly or moderately have a lower risk of stroke than nondrinkers.
                • At and after menopause (ages 50-62), women who drink moderately have stronger bones than nondrinkers.
                • Midlife and older women who drink lightly or moderately have a lower risk of becoming obese than nondrinkers.

                How Much Is Bad?

                • Drinking may trigger hot flashes for some women, although that isn’t based in research. So determine whether it’s a personal trigger for you. (As for a general risk of experiencing hot flashes and night sweats, some studies find alcohol increases it, whereas others find the opposite.)
                • Any amount of alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. The increase in risk is there, but small, for women who drink one drink a day. Women who drink two to five drinks a day have about 1.5 times the risk of nondrinkers. (The increased risk doesn’t seem to have anything to do with alcohol’s effect on estrogen levels.)
                • Drinking alcohol increases the risk of many other cancers. The risk rises with the amount of alcohol consumed. (And the risk rises higher if you smoke as well.)
                • Alcohol has harmful interactions with many medications, even ones you may not think about, such as medicines for arthritis, indigestion or heartburn, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and more. Check out which ones here.
                • More than moderate drinking increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Among heavy drinkers, women are more susceptible to alcohol-related heart disease than men.
                • Women who drink heavily are prone to central obesity—the apple shape that is a big risk for cardiovascular disease.
                • Heavy drinking can lead to osteoporosis that cannot be reversed. It’s also a risk for fractures.
                • Binge drinking increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
                • Women at menopause are especially vulnerable to depression, and heavy drinking can just make that worse. Heavy drinking itself can lead to depression, and women who show signs of alcoholism are two to seven times more at risk of developing depression than men.
                • Alcoholic women are more susceptible than men to key organ system damage, including heart muscle damage, nerve damage, cirrhosis, and possibly brain damage as well.

                Take It Easy

                If you drink alcohol, enjoy yourself, but make sure your drinking is light to moderate. For women, the NIAA puts its low-risk drinking limit at no more than seven drinks a week and no more than three drinks on any single day.

                Provided by:  The North American Menopause Society

                Can Red Wine Reduce Your Risk for Breast Cancer?

                Learn More:

                Need to know more about alcohol and your health? Try the NIAA’s Rethinking Drinkingsite.

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                Posted in Blog, nutrition

                Coconut Crunch Shake

                Eat Like a Woman: Coconut Crunch Shake Mini-Meal!

                The PERFECT mini-meal designed just for women.

                Ingredients

                1 Eat Like a Woman Coconut Crunch smart nutrition bar

                1 cup of almond milk (or skim milk)

                1 small banana

                1 teaspoon vanilla extract

                A few ice cubes

                Instructions:

                Put all the ingredients – crumble the nutrition bar – in a blender and blend until creamy.

                300-350 calories

                Use 1/2 banana = 280 calories

                I love this shake for breakfast when I am on the go.

                For those who enjoy yummy cocktails, add a shot of your favorite rum.

                You can purchase Eat Like a Woman smart nutrition bars here.

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                Posted in nutrition, snacks

                Don’t Diet! Make Easy Food Swaps by Staness Jonekos

                Simple food swaps can help you obtain and maintain your healthy weight for life!

                Swap THIS- With THIS

                White rice- Quinoa or brown rice
                White bread- Whole-wheat pita bread
                Sour cream- Greek yogurt
                Tomato Sauce- Fresh diced tomatoes
                Mayonnaise- Mashed avocado
                Mashed potatoes- Mashed cauliflower
                White pasta- Wheat pasta
                French fries- Sweet potato fries
                Fruit juice- Fruit water
                Flour tortilla- Corn tortilla
                Butter- Olive oil
                Baked potato- Baked sweet potato

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                Delicious doctor-designed meals delivered to your door!



                While it may be fun to put on an apron and whip up a fancy recipe, most of us don’t have time to do that every day. That’s why I partnered with bistroMD, because their meals honor a woman’s specific metabolic rate, they are doctor designed, as well as chef-prepared. What’s better? These gourmet meals are conveniently delivered right to your door.

                At bistroMD it’s not about eating less, but about eating better. Food works as medicine to correct metabolic issues which make losing weight difficult and gaining weight easy.

                The meals consist of a nutritious balance of lean, adequate protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats that are Eat Like a Woman® and Menopause Makeover® approved.

                What I love about bistroMD is they are not a fad diet and their meals are whole and complete, and do not require additional shopping, cooking, or calorie counting. In today’s modern world, bistroMD is a woman’s health and time solution.

                If you thought you couldn’t eat Buckwheat Berry Pancakes for breakfast, think again! The Pork Tenderloin with Plum Sauce is another favorite of mine.

                ORDER TODAY and get our community discount! Click on the image!


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                Eat Like a Woman with bistroMD!

                Welcome to the Eat Like a Woman program,

                Today the modern woman is busy, so I partnered with bistroMD because their meals honor a woman’s specific metabolic rate and they are doctor designed, as well as chef-prepared and conveniently delivered right to your door.

                At bistroMD it’s not about eating less, but about eating better. Food works as medicine to correct metabolic issues which make losing weight difficult and gaining weight easy.

                The meals consist of a nutritious balance of lean, adequate protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats that are Eat Like a Woman® approved.

                I am so excited that bistroMD has given the Eat Like a Woman® community a special discount, so you can get started today. Visit www.bistroMD.com and enter my exclusive code ELAW50 to receive $50 off your first order.*

                What I love about bistroMD is they are not a fad diet and their meals are whole and complete, and do not require additional shopping, cooking, or calorie counting. In today’s modern world, bistroMD is a woman’s health and time solution.

                Be WELL, and if you are a woman…eat like a woman.

                Staness Jonekos
                Women’s Health & Empowerment Advocate
                Author, Eat Like a Woman®

                *New members only. Does not include shipping and cannot be combined with any other offers.

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                Posted in nutrition

                BistroMd

                BistroMD

                Start your Menopause Makeover TODAY with chef prepared meals by the number one meal delivery service* … BistroMD!

                Special for the Menopause Makeover community!

                I am excited to share a meal delivery service that honors the Menopause Makeover Food Pyramid, catered to women and our unique metabolism during menopause.

                BistroMD has a food program for women going through the menopause transition, including heart healthy and low sodium meals, and meals for women who are diabetic!

                I have personally selected BistroMD for my Menopause Makeover community because BistroMd was created by the highly respected Ed and Caroline Cederquist: the foodie and the MD.

                They believe food is medicine and that nourishing your body with the right nutrients will help you achieve a healthy weight.  The power of science combined with GREAT-tasting, REAL food.

                BistroMD understands that the ability to manage your weight is affected by factors like your age, your hormonal changes, genetics and stress.

                They have over 200 delicious entrees that are hand-prepared by chefs and planned by registered dietitians.

                I love that you can choose your meals.  The Odyssey Chicken Crepes with Waldorf Apples for breakfast is a great way to start your day.  Slide into lunch with the scrumptious Citrus Glazed Chicken and end the day with Jerk Tilapia Red Pepper Coulis – so yummy!

                They have a 5-day plan and a 7-day plan.  I enjoyed the 5-day plan because I often meet friends out for dinner, and I would save my uneaten BistroMD meals for the weekend.

                As I was writing The Menopause Makeover sitting in front of the computer 10 hours a day, BistroMD meals kept me healthy and feeling full so I did not gain weight from grabbing poor food choices because I had no time to cook.

                bistroMD Free Shipping

                The 5-day program is $129.95 per week and includes 5 breakfasts, 5 lunches and 5 dinners. The 7-day program is $159.95 for 7 breakfasts, 7 lunches, and 6 dinners to include My Night (a great idea, read more when you click on the image).  And they have a great snack program called EATS, Essential and Tasty Snacks

                There is no MSG, no trans fat, not freeze dried, and no aspartame in the entrees!

                Using natural ingredients and not altering their natural state makes BistroMD the perfect choice to start your Menopause Makeover!

                Get your own personal chef with BistroMD – it’s Menopause Makeover approved!

                ORDER NOW! Click on the image.

                BistroMD

                *In a blind taste test against other weight loss meal delivery programs, BistroMD ranks #1 with a 5-star rating from Next Advisor.com.

                BistroMD was reviewed and ranked the highest against Jenny Craig, Diet to Go, eDiets: Fresh Prepared, Biggest Loser, and Nutrisystem programs. BistroMD was the only meal delivery program rated five stars for all its meals—breakfast, lunch and dinner—in the taste test.

                Free Shipping on bistroMD Diet Delivery

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                Posted in nutrition

                Start your Menopause Makeover with chef prepared meals!


                Start your Menopause Makeover TODAY with chef prepared meals by the number one meal delivery service* … BistroMD!

                Special deal for the Menopause Makeover community!

                I am excited to share a meal delivery service that honors the Menopause Makeover Food Pyramid, catered to women and our unique metabolism during menopause.

                BistroMD has a food program for women going through the menopause transition, including heart healthy and low sodium meals, and meals for women who are diabetic!

                I have personally selected BistroMD for my Menopause Makeover community because BistroMd was created by the highly respected Ed and Caroline Cederquist: the foodie and the MD.

                They believe food is medicine and that nourishing your body with the right nutrients will help you achieve a healthy weight.  The power of science combined with GREAT-tasting, REAL food.

                BistroMD understands that the ability to manage your weight is affected by factors like your age, your hormonal changes, genetics and stress.

                They have over 200 delicious entrees that are hand-prepared by chefs and planned by registered dietitians.

                I love that you can choose your meals.  The Odyssey Chicken Crepes with Waldorf Apples for breakfast is a great way to start your day.  Slide into lunch with the scrumptious Citrus Glazed Chicken and end the day with Jerk Tilapia Red Pepper Coulis – so yummy!

                They have a 5-day plan and a 7-day plan.  I enjoyed the 5-day plan because I often meet friends out for dinner, and I would save my uneaten BistroMD meals for the weekend.

                As I was writing The Menopause Makeover sitting in front of the computer 10 hours a day, BistroMD meals kept me healthy and feeling full so I did not gain weight from grabbing poor food choices because I had no time to cook.

                bistroMD Free Shipping

                There is no MSG, no trans fat, not freeze dried, and no aspartame in the entrees!

                Using natural ingredients and not altering their natural state makes BistroMD the perfect choice to start your Menopause Makeover!

                Get your own personal chef with BistroMD – it’s Menopause Makeover approved!

                ORDER NOW and get our community discount! Click on the image.



                *In a blind taste test against other weight loss meal delivery programs, BistroMD ranks #1 with a 5-star rating from Next Advisor.com.

                BistroMD was reviewed and ranked the highest against Jenny Craig, Diet to Go, eDiets: Fresh Prepared, Biggest Loser, and Nutrisystem programs. BistroMD was the only meal delivery program rated five stars for all its meals—breakfast, lunch and dinner—in the taste test.

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                Do Menopause and Drinking Mix?

                Do menopause and alcohol mix?

                You’ve probably heard that moderate drinking is good for your heart. But you’ve probably also heard that it’s a danger for breast cancer and that it can trigger hot flashes. Here are the facts that can help you make decisions about drinking.

                The most important thing is how much you drink. The benefits come with moderate—big emphasis on moderate—drinking. Starting with the Framingham Heart Study, big epidemiologic studies have shown that while moderate drinking has some benefits, drinking much more than that can be detrimental. More than two drinks per day and the negative effects begin to pile up, with increases in the rates of cancer, stroke, and more.

                What’s One Drink?

                This is how the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAA) defines one standard drink:

                • 5 fluid ounces (one glass) of wine (about 12% alcohol). Don’t let your wine glass fool you—most hold much more than 5 ounces.
                • 12 fluid ounces (usually one can or bottle) of regular beer (about 5% alcohol)
                • 1.5 fluid ounces (one shot) of 80-proof distilled spirits

                This is how the NIAA defines different levels of drinking for women:

                • Light: less than one drink per day
                • Moderate: one to two drinks per day
                • Heavy: more than two drinks per day

                How Much Is Good?

                • Light to moderate drinkers have a significantly lower risk of coronary heart disease than nondrinkers. For women, the heart benefits of moderate drinking become apparent at menopause when their heart disease risk normally goes up, and the heart benefits continue after that. Hormone therapy doesn’t affect that benefit.
                • Women who drink moderately have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.
                • Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, especially wine, have a lower risk of dementia than those who don’t drink at all.
                • Women who drink lightly or moderately have a lower risk of stroke than nondrinkers.
                • At and after menopause (ages 50-62), women who drink moderately have stronger bones than nondrinkers.
                • Midlife and older women who drink lightly or moderately have a lower risk of becoming obese than nondrinkers.

                How Much Is Bad?

                • Drinking may trigger hot flashes for some women, although that isn’t based in research. So determine whether it’s a personal trigger for you. (As for a general risk of experiencing hot flashes and night sweats, some studies find alcohol increases it, whereas others find the opposite.)
                • Any amount of alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. The increase in risk is there, but small, for women who drink one drink a day. Women who drink two to five drinks a day have about 1.5 times the risk of nondrinkers. (The increased risk doesn’t seem to have anything to do with alcohol’s effect on estrogen levels.)
                • Drinking alcohol increases the risk of many other cancers. The risk rises with the amount of alcohol consumed. (And the risk rises higher if you smoke as well.)
                • Alcohol has harmful interactions with many medications, even ones you may not think about, such as medicines for arthritis, indigestion or heartburn, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and more. Check out which ones here.
                • More than moderate drinking increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Among heavy drinkers, women are more susceptible to alcohol-related heart disease than men.
                • Women who drink heavily are prone to central obesity—the apple shape that is a big risk for cardiovascular disease.
                • Heavy drinking can lead to osteoporosis that cannot be reversed. It’s also a risk for fractures.
                • Binge drinking increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
                • Women at menopause are especially vulnerable to depression, and heavy drinking can just make that worse. Heavy drinking itself can lead to depression, and women who show signs of alcoholism are two to seven times more at risk of developing depression than men.
                • Alcoholic women are more susceptible than men to key organ system damage, including heart muscle damage, nerve damage, cirrhosis, and possibly brain damage as well.

                Take It Easy

                If you drink alcohol, enjoy yourself, but make sure your drinking is light to moderate. For women, the NIAA puts its low-risk drinking limit at no more than seven drinks a week and no more than three drinks on any single day.

                Provided by:  The North American Menopause Society

                Can Red Wine Reduce Your Risk for Breast Cancer?

                Learn More:

                Need to know more about alcohol and your health? Try the NIAA’s Rethinking Drinking site.

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                Posted in nutrition

                Hormone Disruptors in Our Food

                Important information when purchasing food!  Hormone disruptors are dangerous to your health.

                Our species evolved in an environment where, for a hundred thousand years or so, the molecules we encountered were natural and our bodies were able to metabolize them.  However, in the mid 1800s, chemists began synthesizing carbon-based molecules that our bodies don’t break down, and some of these stay in our bodies for years. Today there are countless new artificial molecules in our environment, from those that make our hair smell nice or our fingernails look pretty, to cleaners or pesticides.

                When selecting produce, choose fruits and vegetables that have the least exposure to pesticides. Apples, celery, and tomatoes typically have more pesticide residue than, for example, cantaloupe, sweet corn, grapefruit, or sweet potatoes.

                Environmental Working Group‘s 2013 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™

                Eat fruits and vegetables!

                The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Use EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides™ to reduce your exposures as much as possible, but eating conventionally-grown produce is far better than not eating fruits and vegetables at all. The Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ will help you determine which fruits and vegetables have the most pesticide residues and are the most important to buy organic. You can lower your pesticide intake by avoiding the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables and choosing the least contaminated produce.

                For the second year, we have expanded the Dirty Dozen™ with a Plus category to highlight two crops – domestically-grown summer squash and leafy greens, specifically kale and collards. These crops did not meet traditional Dirty Dozen™ criteria but were commonly contaminated with pesticides exceptionally toxic to the nervous system.

                Though the Environmental Protection Agency has been restricting the uses of the most toxic pesticides, they are still detected on some foods. For example, green beans were on last year’s Plus list because they were often contaminated with two highly toxic organophosphates. Those pesticides are being withdrawn from agriculture. But leafy greens still show residues of organophosphates and other risky pesticides. That’s why they are on the Plus list for 2013.

                Tests in 2008 found that some domestically-grown summer squash – zucchini and yellow crookneck squash — contained residues of harmful organochlorine pesticides that were phased out of agriculture in the 1970s and 1980s but that linger on some farm fields.

                Genetically modified plants, or GMOs, are not often found in the produce section of grocery stores. Field corn, nearly all of which is produced with genetically modified seeds, is used to make tortillas, chips, corn syrup, animal feed and biofuels. Because it is not sold as a fresh vegetable, it is not included in EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. Nor is soy, another heavily GMO crop that makes its way into processed food.

                The genetically modified crops likely to be found in produce aisles of American supermarkets are zucchini, Hawaiian papaya and some varieties of sweet corn. Most Hawaiian papaya is a GMO. Only a small fraction of zucchini and sweet corn are GMO. Since U.S. law does not require labeling of GMO produce, EWG advises people who want to avoid it to purchase the organically-grown versions of these items.

                Dirty Dozen PlusTM Clean Fifteen TM             Dirty Dozen PlusTM Clean Fifteen TM

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                Posted in nutrition

                Does Eating Wheat Lead to Weight Gain?

                Is wheat the bad guy?

                It seems everyone is eliminating wheat from their diet.  Some fear wheat is contributing to weight gain, and many are following the lead of popular celebrities and books.  Brigham and Women’s Hospital published a great article on WHEAT FACTS below.  Also learn more about general guidelines and a wheat allergy diet.  Important info ladies.

                By Brigham and Women’s Hospital

                Wheat-free diets are endorsed by some celebrities and the focus of some dietary books; the premise being that wiping out wheat will whittle away unwanted pounds. No one food group, however, is the culprit for excess weight gain or the panacea for weight loss.

                In fact, eating whole-wheat items assists one in consuming whole grains and getting much needed fiber and a variety of key nutrients. What you need to watch out for is the type of wheat foods you’re eating as it is found in many foods that also are packed with calories and low in nutrients. Think baked goods, white bread, low-fiber/sugary cereals to name a few. Less of these foods will generally trim calories and ultimately lead to weight loss, providing one doesn’t add excess calories from other sources. For some individuals such as those with wheat allergies, celiac disease or gluten intolerance, limiting wheat is essential. For others, there’s no need to delete wheat unless you desire. Here are some suggestions for eating wheat in a healthy way:

                • Start your day with a cold cereal – look for whole wheat as the first ingredient.
                • Try whole-wheat varieties of pancakes and waffles topped with fruit.
                • Use whole-wheat pitas, breads or deli-flats when making sandwiches.
                • Switch to whole-wheat pastas. Or as an introduction, mix some whole wheat into your regular pasta.
                • Try whole-wheat couscous.
                • Substitute half whole-wheat flour for recipes calling for flour.
                • Top whole-wheat crackers with hummus, low-fat cheese, or nut butters.
                • Wrap a whole-wheat tortilla around peanut butter and banana or eggs and salsa.

                These whole wheat versions will be more likely to keep you fuller longer, a helpful aid in keeping calories in check. Consider preparing this healthy and delicious recipe that features whole wheat couscous: Greek Couscous Salad with Walnuts.

                Are You Allergic to Wheat?

                If you are allergic to the protein found in wheat, it’s important to read food labels and learn more about wheat substitutes. Learn more about general guidelines and a wheat allergy diet.

                Subscribe to their Health e-newsletter, click here.

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                Menopause Makeover High-Protein Snacks

                Eating high-protein snacks can help you lose weight.

                By Staness Jonekos, Co-author The Menopause Makeover

                A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that skipping high-protein foods may lead to overeating and is often one of the biggest causes of excess weight gain especially during the menopause years.

                Take away the water in your body and about 75 percent of your weight is protein. This chemical family is found throughout the body – in muscle, bone, skin, hair, and virtually every other body part or tissue. It makes up the enzymes that power many chemical reactions and the hemoglobin that carries oxygen in your blood.

                Protein is also called the building blocks for the body.  The body needs protein to build new muscles, cartilage, skin and blood.  It is also needed in order for the body to make hormones, enzyme and many other necessary cells.

                Protein prevents loss of muscle mass and strength.

                Protein increases satiety (the feeling of being satisfied) more than carbohydrates or fats. Animal protein makes you feel full longer than plant protein.

                Incorporate these high-protein snacks for your Menopause Makeover.

                Turkey

                When you’re going for lean protein, low-calorie turkey is one of my favorite choices.   Three ounces of turkey provides a whopping 25 grams of protein for only 140 calories. Deli slices can be high in sodium, so roast a small turkey for dinner and using the leftover slices as nutritious snacks.

                Protein Shakes

                Homemade protein shakes can be a delicious way to add protein to your diet.  Combine protein powder with nonfat milk or almond milk or low-fat soy milk, then add frozen fruit (blueberries rock in protein shakes), ½ banana for creamy texture, ½ tablespoon of flaxseed (or flaxseed oil), ½ tablespoon of honey, and you have a healthy meal replacement or high-protein snack. When you control the ingredients you skip the added sugar that often comes with store-bought protein bars and shakes.

                Cottage Cheese

                Diet staple low-fat cottage cheese is an excellent protein source, with a half-cup of low-fat cottage cheese providing 14 grams of protein for only 81 calories.  Throw in some berries or your favorite fruit and it makes a terrific snack when you want to stay full between meals or can even be a satisfying meal all on its own.  This snack makes an excellent way to start your day.

                Greek Yogurt

                Greek yogurt, which is strained to remove whey, is thicker and creamier than regular yogurt, making it a healthful stand-alone snack, a great mixer for fresh fruit, cereal, or nuts, and a healthy swap for fattier dairy products such as sour cream or cream cheese. The yogurt’s power comes from its protein — Greek yogurt contains 15 to 20 grams of protein in a 6-ounce serving versus 9 grams in regular yogurt.  Add some berries for a yummy snack.

                Eggs

                Eggs have been getting a bad rap for their cholesterol content. Now the American Heart Association has come around and acknowledged that the benefits of eggs might outweigh the cholesterol risks when eaten in moderation (less than six whole eggs per week). One large egg contains 6 grams of protein and only 70 calories. If you’re concerned about cholesterol, many egg substitutes on the market offer lower-cholesterol alternatives that still pack a protein punch.

                Keep a bowl or hard-boiled eggs in your home fridge for an instant healthy snack.

                Tofu

                Tofu or soy bean curd is another excellent high-protein meal base and source of healthy fats and nutrients. Because it absorbs flavors so well and can be cut into cubes, strips, or chunks, it can be prepared in a variety of ways. Some research has shown that consuming soy can reduce risk of breast or prostate cancer, thanks to its high levels of phytoestrogens, though that link is still being studied.

                Edamame

                Edamame (young soybeans sold in pods and or shelled) contain about 36 percent protein, which is 86 percent higher than mature soybeans. Edamame’s low oil content, combined with its high protein content, makes this vegetable very popular with health-conscious people who want a low-fat, protein-rich snack. Vegetarians and vegans who want a high protein food will find that edamame’s protein is complete, which means it contains all nine essential amino acids the human body needs

                Lentils

                As vegans and vegetarians know, lentils pack a powerful punch of protein, fiber, and minerals while containing comparatively few calories and almost no fat. A cup of cooked lentils offers 22 grams of protein, about 300 calories, and less than 1 gram of fat. Lentils are also relatively quick to prepare for a meal or snack, and because they soak up the flavors of whatever they’re cooked with, they can make a tasty base for many dishes.

                Nut Butter

                Chances are, you loved peanut butter as a kid, but you may have shied away from this traditional treat as an adult because of concerns about fat. Peanut, almond, cashew and other nut butters are high-protein foods, with about two tablespoons providing 7 grams of protein. And though nut butter does contain fat and saturated fat, it can be part of a healthy diet when eaten in small amounts. Just remember not to slather it on crackers — instead, spread it on carrot or celery sticks for healthy snacking.

                Nuts

                Whether you go for cashews, walnuts, pistachios or any of the other varieties, whole, raw nuts are a healthy high-protein snack choice. If you’re concerned about calories, limit your nut intake to a handful or two, and remember that though nuts are high in fat, it’s healthy monounsaturated fat, which doesn’t clog arteries and is an essential part of a healthy diet. Plus, nuts are high in fiber, which when paired with their protein content, keeps you feeling full longer.

                It doesn’t matter which nut you go nuts for — they all have health benefits — but research consistently indicates that almonds might be the best of the bunch. Numerous studies have found that almonds can help lower levels of harmful LDL cholesterol. They are also extremely high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and have been shown to help manage weight.

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                Conquer Menopausal Belly Fat

                By Staness Jonekos

                Co-Author, The Menopause Makeover

                Most women will agree that going through “the change” can pack on the pounds.

                According to the North American Menopause Society, more than 70% of women ages 55 to 75, and 65% of women ages 45 to 55 are overweight (BMI greater than 25).  More than 40% are obese (BMI greater or equal to 30). With the average age of natural menopause in the Western world being 51, it is no surprise many blame the menopause transition on weight gain and extra belly fat.

                What causes weight gain and that unwanted belly fat during these years?  Until recently there was no scientific evidence that menopause was the culprit for your increased waist size.  But now there is some evidence that menopause may be related to changes in body composition and fat distribution.  Several studies have shown that menopause is associated with increased fat in the abdominal region as well as decreased lean body mass, independent of age.

                While the jury is out deciding if menopause is guilty, aging and lifestyle are mostly responsible.  Lean body mass decreases with age, and burning fewer calories through less activity increase fat mass and weight gain.

                Not getting enough sleep, whether suffering from stress or night sweats, can cause changes in serum leptin and ghrelin levels increasing your appetite.   68,000 women studied in the Nurses’ Health Study found that women who slept five hour or less gained 2.5 pounds.  Women sleeping six hours gained 1.6 pounds.  61% of peri- and postmenopausal women report suffering from insomnia. If you are suffering from night sweats affecting your sleep, discuss treatment management options with your healthcare provider. The optimal amount of sleep varies from person to person, but 6 to 9 hours of sleep is a good rule of thumb.

                The good news? Mid-life belly fat can be managed!  Making lifestyle adjustments can put you in the healthy BMI category (18.5 to 24.9).

                • Eat lean proteins, low to medium glycemic carbohydrates and healthy fats, combined with exercise most days of the week for 30 to 60 minutes can do the trick.
                • Limit your intake of saturated and trans fat and cholesterol.
                • Adjust your portion sizes.
                • Do not over consume beverages with sugars and caffeine.
                • Consume alcohol in moderation – some research has shown that red wine can have health benefits.
                • Decrease salt and processed foods.
                • Stop smoking.
                • When you dine out, take half home for lunch tomorrow.

                These are all good common-sense strategies that work for everyone, but they are non-negotiable for menopausal women.  It takes commitment and effort to make lasting change.  If you do the work, you will maintain a healthy weight and manage that unwanted belly fat.

                This is also an important time to work closely with your healthcare provider.  Increased weight and belly fat can increase your risk of getting type 2 diabetes, CVD, stroke, hypertension, and some cancers.

                It is important to set realistic goals.  If you expect to look like your 20s, you may be disappointed. With a loss of skin tone and muscle mass from aging you just won’t look that same naked, but you are not alone.  Men too suffer from similar aging frustrations.

                Focus on health, and you will feel happier about your body.

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                Posted in nutrition

                Weight Loss Tip

                Fiber can help you lose those unwanted menopausal pounds – it was my secret weapon to weight loss!

                Fiber is the part of plants that cannot be digested. When you eat fiber, it passes through your body virtually unchanged.

                Benefits of fiber

                • Helps keep your bowel movements regular and stools soft
                • Moves FAT through your digetive system more quickly – an added benefit in the battle against medsection belly fat
                • Can help you lose weight
                • Leaves you feeling full longer
                • Keeps your blood sugar on an even keel
                • Can help transport bad cholesterol out of your body
                • Can help reduce the risk of certain diseases (heart disease, diabetes)

                Sources of Fiber


                Apples, strawberries, blueberries, pears, cucumbers (not pickles too salty),celery, tomatoes, oatmeal, oat bran, lentils, beans, zucchini, brown rice, barley, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, beets, couscous , whole-wheat breads and cereals, seeds.

                The USDA recommends that you get at least 25 grams of fiber a day, but most of us consume less than 10 grams per day. Try to include some fiber at every meal, and make fruits and veggies part of your daily snacks.

                Enjoy fiber daily!

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                Is drinking coffee making you fat?

                Used over the long term, caffiene actually reduces your metabolism. You come to need increasing amounts of caffiene just to stay alert. The slower metabolism actually causes you to gain weight on less food.

                It raises cortisol levels in the body. Cortisol is a hormone that is responsible for fat storage in the body.

                It causes your blood sugar to spike. Then after the caffeine begins to wear off your blood sugar plummets. This causes you to crave sugar. In other words you think your hungry when you’re really not. This is obviously counterproductive to your weight loss goal. Have you ever noticed you crave carbohydrates after a cup of coffee. This is why. Your body is tring to get you to eat some carbohydrates to get your blood sugar back to where it should be.

                The end result of caffeine is really fatigue. After caffeine wears off you are tired. Then you have more caffeine. Then you are tired. By the end of the day most people who drink coffee are exhausted and they dont know why. This fatigue makes it difficult to exercise which is a one of the most important ways we should be getting our energy.

                Coffee not only is proven in women to add fat to the body, it has also been proven in studies that people who drink coffee sleep much less.

                Also, many of us use creamers and/or sugar = more calories.

                Coffee will dehydrate you. Depending on your intake of coffee, you may be ruining all that extra water you have been drinking to reduce your body storing water.

                People who drink too much coffee may have some stomach problems. The caffeine irrates the lining of the stomach as it has a heavy acidic content.

                Caffeine may also cause the body to lose calcium, and that can lead to bone loss over time.

                Drink one cup or less of caffeine a day and enjoy lots of fresh water!

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                Posted in nutrition

                Poppy Seed Crusted Salmon


                By Catherine S. Katz, Ph.D

                Catherine developed the recipes and meal plan for The Flavor Full Diet

                She also contributes to ABetterBagOfGroceries.com

                This simply delicious recipe is high in protein, low in glycemic carbs, and rich in healthy fats– a perfect fit for The Menopause Makeover!

                Serves 4

                4 salmon filets* (about 1 ½ lbs-wild Alaskan preferably)
                2 egg whites
                12 TLC Kashi® TLC 7-grain crackers
                2 Tbsp poppy seeds
                ¼ tsp salt
                fresh ground pepper to taste
                2 Tbsp olive oil

                Directions

                1. Rinse and dry the salmon filets and set aside.
                2. Whisk egg whites with a fork in a wide shallow dish and set aside.
                3. Place the Kashi crackers in a coffee grinder or mini food processor and grind finely.
                4. Combine the finely ground Kashi® crackers, poppy seeds, salt and pepper on flat plate and set aside.
                5. Dip salmon filets, one at a time, first in the egg whites then in the poppy crumbs, making sure to coat both sides well. Repeat with all the filets
                6. Heat olive oil in a large non stick pan that can hold all 4 filets and sear the filets over medium high heat for 2-3 minutes on each side to brown.

                Per serving: 393 calories; 22 g fat (3 g sat fat); 42 g protein, 6 g carbohydrate; 1 grams fiber; 107 mg cholesterol; 298 mg sodium

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                Fatigue-Fighting Foods

                iStock_000000501044XSmall Fatigue-Fighting Foods
                7 Helpful Tips for Sustaining Energy Throughout the Day

                Article provided by Clevland Clinic’s Speaking of Women’s Health

                When our bodies crave a “pick-me-up,” we typically choose sugar or caffeine. True, they boost our energy levels, fast. But they don’t have staying power.

                Our bodies break all foods down into simple sugars for energy, whether they are highly refined carbs, complex carbs, proteins or fats. Highly processed foods, such as white bread, candy and desserts, are absorbed and digested so quickly that they spike our blood sugar levels, which then plummet.

                So we feel a burst of energy followed by a crash. This typically sends us looking for another energy boost (typically more sugar). When this cycle continues, we become fatigued, can’t concentrate, lose our “oomph” and may get headaches. Fortunately, following a few key rules can stop this blood sugar roller-coaster ride and give us sustained energy:

                1. Never skip breakfast. Research shows that people who eat breakfast perform better at tasks, eat fewer overall calories and miss fewer days of work and school than those who don’t.
                2. Don’t overdo the caffeine. A daily cup or two of java is fine. Going overboard sets you up for fatigue later in the day.
                3. Avoid highly refined carbohydrates and seek out fiber. Carbohydrates provide us with much-needed energy, but choosing highly refined carbs over whole grains creates a blood sugar roller-coaster.
                4. Add a small amount of lean protein to meals and snacks. Protein takes longer to digest and absorb. When eaten with a carbohydrate, it slows the release of sugar into the bloodstream, sustaining energy.
                5. Choose small, frequent meals to fuel your day. Remember not to skip meals. Your energy levels can fall so low that you’ll overeat at the next meal or graze on unhealthy snacks.
                6. Get adequate sleep. Most of us need at least seven to eight hours to avoid fatigue, bolster immune defenses and perform at our best.
                7. Engage in regular physical activity. Exercise actually boosts energy levels, especially when done regularly. It can also help us sleep better.
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                How much water should you consume?

                iStock_000008294027XSmall Two thirds of our body weight is water.  Blood is 83 percent water, muscles 75 percent, bone 22 percent and the brain 74 percent… water is obviously good for you. Without water you would dehydrate, and your vital organs would shut down.  Water is a necessity for life.  Water is the most important molecule, second to oxygen, to live.

                Benefits of drinking water:

                ·     Keeps skin healthy and radiant.

                ·     Helps regulate body temperature.

                ·     Transports nutrients to your organs.

                ·     Removes waste.

                ·     Maintains overall health.

                How much water do you need to consume?

                There is no one water consumption formula that works for everyone.  The Institute of Medicine advises that women consume 9 cups (2.2 liters) of total beverages per day.

                Your Personal Water Needs Depend On Many Factors:

                • For every 20 minutes of exercise you do each day, drink 8 ounces of water.
                • Hot or humid weather can increase sweating, increasing your fluid retention.
                • If you are ill, suffering from a fever, vomiting or diarrhea causing a loss of fluids, drink more water.
                • If you drink alcohol, add an equal amount of water.  For example, 6 ounces of wine should be matched with 6 ounces of water consumption.
                • Bottom line: hydrate based on your needs.

                On average, 80% of your body’s water comes from drinking water and beverage sources, and 20% of water comes from food sources.  Many women consume coffee, tea,and sodas, thinking it is a source for water.

                Although it is made mostly with water, nothing can replace the enormous benefits of pure water.

                Limit yourself to no more than two three-ounce cups of caffeine (coffee,tea, soda) per day.

                If you are on blood pressure medication such as diuretics, or have a history of heart problems or swelling in your legs, you may need to adjust your fluid intake, so discuss this with your health care provider!

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                Submit Your Favorite Recipe

                Submit your favorite recipe!

                Rules: Your recipe must honor The Menopause Makeover Food Pyramid guidelines:

                35% of calories from Lean Protein

                40% of calories from Low glycemic carbs

                35% of calories from Healthy Fats

                Email Staness@MenopauseMakeover.com and submit your recipe.

                If your recipe is Menopause Makeover approved, it will be posted for other women to enjoy.

                You may submit a recipe and/or a menu.

                Once you submit your recipe you will automatically be entered to win a FREE one hour personal Menopause Makeover consultation with Staness.

                The winner will be randomly selected and announced August 1, 2010.

                Inspire others with your delicious Menopause Makeover Approved healthy dish!

                EMAIL your recipe today.

                Staness@MenopauseMakeover.com

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                Posted in nutrition, recipes

                The Thermic Effect of Food

                iStock_000003323578XSmallWhen you follow the Menopause Makeover Food Pyramid, you will be using the thermic effect of food to help burn off that stubborn menopause belly fat. The thermic effect of food is the amount of energy it takes your body to digest food.

                Thermic Effect for:

                Proteins: About 30%
                Carbohydrates: About 20%
                Fats: About 3%

                Your body is using more energy to digest protein, helping you speed up your metabolism. A higher metabolism is your secret weapon to weight loss and good health. Knowing what foods speed up your metabolism can help you lose weight and burn belly fat.

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                Posted in nutrition, tips

                Are you counting calories or nutritional value?

                meno-nutrition copySMALLCounting calories helped me conquer the menopause bulge! Thanks to Dr. David Katz, director and co-founder of the Yale Prevention Research Center who created a nutritional scoring system called NuVal, I was able to watch calories and eat nutritious foods!

                Dr. Katz, nutrition columnist to “O” Magazine and medical contributor for ABC News, created NuVal to make your life easier when making food selections. If you ask yourself “what are the healthiest breads, snack bars, cereals, and pastas,” then Dr. Katz has a solution for you.

                Should you buy wheat or oatmeal bread? Are pretzels more nutritious than tortilla chips? These are the decisions that NuVal scores can help you make – in seconds – as you’re walking down the supermarket aisle. NuVal is currently in use in more than 525 supermarkets in 18 states. Click here for grocery store locations.

                The Nuval Scoring System assigns the healthiness score to various food items on a scale from 1 to 100. The scale uses criteria like vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and healthy omega three fat content in the rating. Also, the system takes into account the sugar and cholesterol content of the food.

                The Menopause Makeover supports good nutrition, and the NuVal scoring system can make your life easier when making food choices. Do you know the healthiest breads or salty snacks? You may be surprised. Click here for the scores of your favorite foods.

                Recently, The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), a leading organization of some of the country’s top physicians committed to preventing disease and promoting health, has officially endorsed the NuVal Nutritional Scoring System as an easy and effective way to help consumers learn about the foods they buy.

                “When we created NuVal, our primary goal was to address the public health crisis related to food choices, including obesity and diabetes, with a simple solution that was accessible to everyone,” Dr. Katz said. “We feel we have created that in NuVal and are delighted to gain the acceptance of an organization that shares our passion for health promotion.”

                It is never too late to improve your health with good nutrition.

                NuVal takes all the guesswork out of identifying truly more nutritious food. When you are battling the menopause bulge, good nutrition is the ticket to good health.

                NuVal is Menopause Makeover approved!

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                Posted in nutrition

                Menopause Makeover approved recipes from Hungry Girl!

                When it comes to food, I have a confession – I LOVE Hungry Girl. Hungry Girl says, “I’m not a nutritionist, I’m just hungry.” Sound familiar? Lisa Lillien, aka Hungry Girl, struggled with weight issues most of her life and over the years accumulated tons of diet and food tips. After getting her weight under control she dedicated her time to finding ways to eating super delicious foods using yummy recipes supported with nutritional information that keep your taste buds happy and calorie intake reasonable. Lisa considers herself a “foodologist,” an educated eater and committed to real-world food survival strategies. Lisa is a real gal struggling with the same food issues most of us struggle with everyday.

                Of course Lisa is way younger than I am and nowhere near menopause, but I love her recipes and they work with the 8-step, 12-week Menopause Makeover program.

                51vWMTVg53L._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA115_ 1 I want to share two of my favorite Hungry Girl recipes from Lisa’s latest book, Hungry Girl: 200 under 200: 200 Recipes under 200 Calories. Both recipes are less than 200 calories, made by using lean protein choices, they are easy to make, and honor The Menopause Makeover Food Pyramid. Eating five to six mini-meals a day keeps your feeling full and can help speed up your metabolism – a good thing when you are fighting the ever-expanding waistline dilemma during menopause. Healthy eating should be a lifestyle during menopause and beyond! Click here to find out if you are at a healthy weight.

                Start your day off
                El Ginormo Oven-Baked Southwest Omelette
                Makes 4 servings

                Ingredients
                2½ cups fat-free liquid egg substitute
                ½ cup fat-free milk
                ½ cup shredded reduced-fat cheese blend (look for one with Cheddar and Monterey Jack)
                ½ cup chopped red bell pepper
                ½ cup chopped onion
                ½ cup canned black beans, rinsed and drained
                ½ cup canned sweet corn, drained
                ¼ cup canned diced green chilies
                1 tablespoon minced garlic
                1 teaspoon cumin
                ½ teaspoon dry taco seasoning mix
                Optional toppings: salsa, fat-free sour cream, chopped scallions

                Directions
                Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

                Line a deep, round casserole dish (about 9 inches wide) with aluminum foil. Spray lightly with nonstick spray, making sure to coat the sides as well as the bottom.

                In a large bowl, combine egg substitute, milk, cumin, and taco seasoning. Whisk mixture for 1 minute, until mixed thoroughly.

                Add all of the other ingredients and mix well. Carefully transfer egg mixture to the casserole dish.

                Bake in the oven for 60 to 70 minutes, until the top has puffed and the center is firm. Allow to cool slightly before cutting.

                Cut into four slices. If you like, finish off with the optional toppings – we highly recommend ‘em!

                Nutritional information per serving (1/4 of recipe)
                188 calories
                22g protein
                2.5g fiber
                17g carbs
                3g fat

                This next recipe is delicious for lunch
                Chicken Fajita Pita
                1 serving, entire recipe

                Ingredients
                3 ounces raw boneless skinless lean chicken breast, cut into strips
                One-half whole-wheat or high-fiber pita
                ¼ cup sliced green bell pepper
                ¼ cup sliced onions
                1 small lettuce leaf
                1 teaspoon dry fajita seasoning mix
                Optional toppings: salsa, fat-free sour cream

                Directions
                In a small bowl, combine fajita seasoning with 1 tablespoon water, until mixed well.

                Add chicken, green pepper, and onions to the bowl, and stir to coat evenly with seasoning mixture. Place bowl in the fridge to marinate for at least 30 minutes.

                Once marinated, bring a medium pan sprayed with nonstick spray to medium-high heat. Add contents of bowl, including any excess marinade, to the pan. Sauté until chicken is cooked through, stirring frequently, 5 to 7 minutes.

                Place lettuce leaf inside the pita, and then fill pita with chicken-and-veggie mixture. Add some salsa and/or fat-free sour cream, if you like.

                Nutritional information per serving (entire recipe)
                180 calories
                22.5g protein
                3.5g fiber
                18.5g carbs
                1.5g fat

                I have been enjoying Hungry Girl’s newsletters for the past three years. I’m excited to share Hungry Girl with YOU! You can subscribe to Hungry Girl’s daily newsletter and get news, food finds, recipes, and real-world survival strategies. It’s great waking up to her daily emails.

                Enjoy these Menopause Makeover approved Hungry Girl recipes!

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                Posted in nutrition

                Yummy Recipes, Menopause Makeover APPROVED!

                Featured Guest Chef, Dana Slatkin

                Recipe #1: Roasted Halibut with Fennel-Tomato Sauce
                Recipe #2: Asparagus Egg White Omelet

                After two years listing my personal favorite recipes honoring The Menopause Makeover food pyramid, I am thrilled to dedicate this section to guest chefs and their favorite recipes, entertaining ideas, and healthy cooking tips. Our first featured guest is Dana Slaktin, chef of the famous Shutters on the Beach Hotel in Santa Monica, California, and author of The Summertime Anytime Cookbook.

                Dana gradated from the Culinary Institute of America, and has worked in acclaimed kitchens in France and New York. She launched the Beverly Hills Farmer’s Market and has her own line of food products. Successfully combining elegance with delicious easy-to-prepare dishes that are healthy, Dana lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three gorgeous children.

                Dana Slatkin’s cookbook, The Summertime Anytime Cookbook, can be purchased at The Menopause Makeover Store, click here.

                Check out Dana’s website: www.DanaSlatkin.com

                Recipe #1: Dana’s roasted halibut with fennel-tomato sauce recipe is easy to make and absolutely delicious. This roasted halibut recipe is high in protein, and low in fat. Serve with steamed greens and you have a perfectly balanced meal that is low in calories that will honor your Menopause Makeover.

                Roasted Halibut with Fennel-Tomato Sauce
                This dish satisfies a protein craving without leaving you lethargic, even on the steamiest night. Don’t be deterred by the long list of ingredients. Once they have been assembled, they can be left simmering on the stove while you relax or prepare the rest of the meal. Toasting the spices for a few minutes in a dry pan over medium heat will intensify their flavors. The result is an alluring light sauce that complements any white-fleshed fish.

                Serves 8

                1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus a small amount for cooking the fish
                1 medium yellow onion, sliced
                3 stalks celery, chopped
                2 medium leeks, chopped
                8 garlic cloves, minced
                1 small fennel bulb with greens, chopped
                4 pounds ripe plum tomatoes (about 14), seeded and chopped
                1 tablespoon fennel seeds, toasted
                1 tablespoon mustard seeds, toasted
                2 bay leaves
                Pinch of red pepper flakes
                3 star anise, optional
                2 cups white wine
                2 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
                Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
                8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small cubes
                8 (6 to 8-ounce) skinless halibut fillets (preferably thick)

                1. Prepare the fennel-tomato sauce: In a large saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, leeks, and garlic and cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the fennel bulb and greens and sauté until wilted, a few more minutes. Add the tomatoes, fennel seeds, mustard seeds, bay leaves, red pepper flakes, and star anise. Add the wine and enough broth to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer uncovered for about 45 minutes until slightly thickened. Strain through a fine- mesh sieve into another saucepan, season to taste with salt and pepper, and set aside. The sauce can be made up to this point and refrigerated overnight.

                2. Preheat the oven to 350′F.

                3. Season both sides of the fish with salt and pepper. In a large ovenproof sauté pan, heat a thin film of olive oil over medium-high heat until very hot. Cook the fish until nicely browned on one side, about 4 minutes. Transfer the pan to the oven and roast for 4 to 5 more minutes, until fish is opaque at the thickest part (test with the tip of a knife).

                4. Return the sauce to a simmer. Whisk in the cubes of butter, one at a time, until incorporated.

                5. Ladle a generous amount of sauce into warm serving bowls; gently place the fish on top, and serve.

                Recipe #2: Another fabulous favorite from Dana’s cookbook, Asparagus Egg White Omelet, will kick the day off with a low calorie, high protein blast leaving you feeling full for hours!

                Asparagus Egg White Omelet

                The trick to making an omelet look like the professionals do is a well-oiled pan and adequately whipped egg whites. Add some diced vegetables from last night’s dinner or your favorite cheese for extra kick. Serve it with fresh fruit, breakfast potatoes or a simple mixed green salad.

                Makes 2 omelets

                4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
                6 asparagus spears, tough ends trimmed, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
                Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
                8 large egg whites
                2 tablespoons chopped chives

                1. In a small nonstick pan, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat. Add the asparagus and cook, tossing gently, until tender but still crunchy. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

                2. In a medium bowl, beat the egg whites with a fork until frothy. Add the chives and season the mixture generously with salt and pepper.

                3. Using the same nonstick pan, heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat. Pour half the egg-white mixture into the pan and, using a spatula, quickly draw the edges to the center so that the omelet cooks evenly. Reduce the heat and continue cooking until egg-whites are set but still creamy.

                4. Spoon half of the asparagus in the center of the cooked egg-whites and leave on the heat for a half minute or so longer. Using a spatula, fold the omelet toward one edge of the pan, giving the pan a light tap to loosen the omelet. Slide the omelet onto a warm serving plate.

                5. Repeat the process for the second omelet. Serve immediately.

                Thank you Dana for sharing your elegant and yummy recipes!

                hungrygirlLisa Lillien, founder of HungryGirl.com, will be our next guest “foodologist!” Lisa’s guilt-free recipes can be found in her upcoming book, 200 under 200. Yep, that’s 200 hundred recipes, under 200 calories! During the menopause transition, every calorie counts. Lisa is a hungry girl like the rest of us, but she has managed to create sinful recipes that are low calorie and tasty, so you can meet your food goals. Lisa’s new easy-to-use cookbook, 200 under 200, can be purchased at The Menopause Makeover Store, click here.

                51svJGyrQNL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA240_SH20_OU01_Check out Hungry Girl’s website and purchase her first book, Hungry Girl: Recipes and Survival Strategies for Guilt-Free Eating in the Real World. Hungry-Girl.com

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